Comparative Study on The Digital Game and Computer Simulation to Curtail Student’s Misconception about Heat & Temperature

  • Farooq Ali Department of Physics, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Inam Ul Haq Chand Bagh College Sheikhupura, Pakistan
  • Kamran Ul Haq Engage Research Lab, University of Sunshine Coast, Sippy Down, Australia
  • Afnan Bashir University of Management and Technology
  • Humza Riaz Department of Physics, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan

Abstract

In this research article we explore the efficacy of a game-based learning approach to improve students understanding of the fundamental concepts of physics such as, heat and temperature. Heat and temperature are complex to learn by traditional learning methods. Students face complexities in learning such concepts of Physics. These complexities such as, mixing up the concept of heat and temperature and misinterpretation about the definition which results in misconceptions. A comparison was made between computer simulation-based learning (CSBL) and digital game-based learning (DGBL) for their ability to effectively deliver the concepts of heat and temperature. In this research we use quasi-experimental design with 72 participants (mean age of 19.31 and standard deviation of 1.30). They were divided in two groups (game and simulation). The data was collected by Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ type paper) in accordance with the measured graduated scale Certain Response Index (CRI). The participants of the game group had shown significant decrease of 20% misconceptions in post-test based on CRI scale as compared to the simulation group which was only 16%. The research concludes that the sketch of misconception among students have minimized about 4 % more in case of “game group” than “simulation group”. The study has been carried out in different colleges of the Lahore, Pakistan. The use of digital game and simulation in the computer-supported environment has given a positive outcome.

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Published
2021-05-25
How to Cite
ALI, Farooq et al. Comparative Study on The Digital Game and Computer Simulation to Curtail Student’s Misconception about Heat & Temperature. European Journal of Physics Education, [S.l.], v. 12, n. 2, p. 1-10, may 2021. ISSN 1309-7202. Available at: <http://www.eu-journal.org/index.php/EJPE/article/view/298>. Date accessed: 26 sep. 2022.
Section
Articles